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Start Saying More

Bridging the gap between you and a therapist

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At Start Saying More, our goal is to connect minority individuals with a mental health provider that they are most likely to feel secure sharing and healing with. We aim to reduce the likelihood of individuals prematurely withdrawing from therapy due to an unsatisfactory experience/lack of connection. We want individuals from minority groups to get into therapy and continue receiving counseling from a mental health provider that they are able to connect and grow with! Using our detailed survey, we will match your personality, area(s) of concern, experiences, and preferences with professionals in our database that are just right for you. Essentially, we’re helping to reduce the stress associated with looking for a new provider. We want to make it easier for you.

How It Works

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1

Complete the Myers-Briggs’ Personality test to receive your five factor personality type.

2

Complete our detailed survey to provide us with your personality factors, experiences, preferences, and area(s) of concern.

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3

Our intelligent algorithm will use the results you have provided us with to match you with mental health professionals.

4

You will receive a list of professionals that you can contact so you can begin your healing journey!

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Who can benefit from therapy,
you ask?

Anybody can benefit from therapy! If you have memories, you can benefit from therapy! Every single one of our experiences has on effect on who we are and how we respond to the normal daily stressors of life. Just as people exercise at the gym to strengthen their muscles, we all need to strengthen our brains as well. It is a muscle, afterall! Mental illness and therapy have been historically stigmatized to be restricted for people who are “crazy.” This assumption is dangerous, and very false, and many people and groups have been working hard to normalize mental wellness. It is also very important, though, that in our quest to normalize mental wellness, we do not further stigmatize mental illness. Mental illness goes far beyond what most of us understand, so it is critical that we learn ourselves enough to have empathetic reactions to those around us.

So, why wait? Start Saying More today!